Posted in Quickies

Welcome Me Back

IMG_2448Hi, everyone.  Just wanted to let everyone (that’s five of you, right?) know that after six months of debilitating vertigo…I’m back!  I’m reading all kinds of blogs and videos about how to be a blogger.  A video on Darren Rowse’s ProBlogger website led me here to work on my WordPress page.  I’m still learning, so hang in there!  If you want to be friends with me on Facebook, look for me under Zanna Shirmana.

Au Revoir!  (I’m learning French, too.)

 

 

Posted in Shares

Writing, Editing and other anxieties.

Check out Melody’s blog!

melody

My first novel is off to formatting and my beta reader, yes just one, but she says she is enjoying it. Of course, she could be just being nice but everyone in my group of walking folks tells me, Sue is a straight shooter and won’t say anything much at all if she didn’t like it. Actually, Sue told me if she doesn’t like a book she’s reading she stops. She doesn’t have a lot of reading time and won’t waste it on a book that bores her.

The next novel is not quite finished but I’ve been editing what was already written. I’m surprised at how far I’d gotten before I had to stop and try to launch LIGHTED WINDOWS. The next book is titled A MIND MATTER and while I hate that title, I’ve yet to come up with a better one. Right now I’m stuck in the fog…

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When Is Your Script Ready To Shop?

Screenwriters, here’s another important blog from Tony Folden.

The Dialogue Architect

I’m writing this blog because a lot of beginning screenwriters think that once they’ve finished writing their first draft that they can send it out to producers or agents or any number of famous people and get it sold. This can actually do you more damage than good. With all do respect to all of you newbs out there, your first draft is shit! Hell, your first script is shit! And if you go showing it to the powers that be, it could destroy your chances of getting a meeting with them in the future when you’ve actually learned a thing or two about screenwriting.

I would wager that no screenwriter has ever sold the very first script they’ve ever written. Oaky, maybe there’s one guy out there, but he wrote many other screenplays after his first. And he most likely sold other screenplays before rewriting his first script and…

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You Want To Be A Professional Writer?

Professional writer wannabes, this is a must-read.

The Dialogue Architect

Every wannabe writer hears it all the time: “You want to be a writer? You need to write everyday!” What does that really mean? There are so many other elements to becoming a writer, like research, rewrites, character development, etc., who has time to write everyday? Professional writers, that’s who.

People who get paid to write write everyday, and they also do all those other things that come along with it. Professional writers get paid to juggle many projects at once. They are researching one, while writing another, and rewriting yet another. I know, you thought being a writer would be all fun and no work. Well, you’re wrong. Just like anything you get paid to do, there are elements that will be considered work.

So now the question is, “How much time do I have to invest?” First of all, did you just say have to invest? You…

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On Writing and NaNoWriMo

Just some thoughts from a fellow writer.

melody

I decided I would join the National Novel Writing Month challenge and committed to finishing my second novel, MIND MATTERS in the month of November. It seemed like a good idea at the time. I’m quite good at procrastination and forcing myself to finish this work should forestall my usual dithering.

Today being Friday the 13th seems like a good time to face my mistakes, well, some of them anyway. The list is long, so I’ll just admit I’m not progressing well on my writing challenge. What was I thinking? Finish a book I was only on Chapter Twelve of in the space of one month??? Madness, sheer madness! I’m actually writing here to avoid the pages of my story. It’s not that I don’t know where to go with the story. I have it all mapped out in my head and up until now, it was flowing rather well…

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Writing a Better Antagonist

There’s no story with out an antagonist.

The Dialogue Architect

In honor of Halloween (I know I’m late, but at least I’m close) I decided to discuss the characters we all love to hate… or is that hate to love? Either works. I’m talking about the antagonist of a story. Now not every antagonist is a villain, but… every villain is an antagonist. The bad guy in your story doesn’t need to be bad just for the sake of being bad. That’s a villain, and sometimes a villain can become a caricature. We don’t want that. Unless of course you’re writing a comedy and then all bets are off. Make him a Snidely Whiplash if you’re going for over the top humor. What I’m here to discuss is how to create a memorable antagonist. One your audience will either hate to love or… well, you get the idea.

Every story needs conflict. Without conflict your hero is free to do…

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Before You Start Writing Your Script:

Some good pointers for any screenplay writers out there.

The Dialogue Architect

Before you type that first bit of dialogue. Before you type the words FADE IN. Before you even open Final Draft, there is much work to be done. Some new writers start their scripts before they even know the protagonist’s name. Some experienced writers may do this as well, but I’m going to give you 5 things to do before you start your script that will save you lots of time and several rewrites.

First: Know your characters! Especially your hero! Take some time to figure out what makes your characters tick. I know some writers will develop an entire backstory for their characters, most of which they never use, but it helps them know how their characters will react in any given situation. I’m not saying you have to write pages and pages of backstory on each character, but a few paragraphs, maybe even a page or…

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